Monday, July 18, 2016

We Don't Talk Like That: 'Fargo' and the Midwest Psyche

The 1996 movie "Fargo" stirred widespread curiosity about snowy winters, funny accents and bloody mayhem on the frozen tundra of North Dakota and Minnesota. The film won two Oscar awards and inspired a popular television series of the same name. But how well did it actually capture and reflect the region? In this documentary, 2 below zero producers Diane Richard and Todd Melby unravel the mystery behind the parkas, prowlers and wood chippers in interviews with actors William H. Macy (Jerry Lundegaard), John Carroll Lynch (Norm Gunderson), Stephen Park (Mike Yanagita), Tony Denman (Scotty Lundegaard), dialect coach Liz Himelstein, women in law enforcement, and many more. Narrated by Bruce Bohne (Deputy Lou). Essential listening for diehard fans of "Fargo." (Photo courtesy Gramercy Pictures.)

Monday, July 11, 2016

Minn. governor walks through crowd of protesters

I shot this video for The Washington Post of Minn. Governor Mark Dayton walking through a crowd of protesters after meeting with family members of Philando Castile, a black man who was shot by police in Falcon Heights, Minn.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Child Victims Act stories for MPR News

In the spring of 2016, I reported three stories on childhood sexual abuse for MPR News, the statewide public radio network in Minnesota.

Sex abuse victims say Minn. law brought hope, chance for justice

Children's Theatre awaits final sex abuse lawsuits

Beyond clergy: Ex-Boy Scouts tap Minn. law to press sex abuse claims

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Hello USA

"Black Gold Boom," a television documentary airing on PBS stations nationwide, has aired on PBS World Channel, statewide networks in New Mexico, North Dakota, Alaska and Wyoming and individual PBS stations in Minneapolis/St.Paul, Denver, South Texas and Daytona Beach, Florida. It's also airing soon Sacramento, California. The documentary centers on the debate over fracking among the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara people of western North Dakota. I worked on this project for two years so I'm really happy people are getting to see it. There's more information here.

Sunday, August 9, 2015

This Is Our Home Now

Kendra Hill moved to the Bakken with her husband a few years ago. Thanks to a high-paying oilfield job, the young couple could afford to start a family and buy a house. No matter what happens in oil country, they’re planning to stay in North Dakota. This story aired on Prairie Public and Marketplace as part of my "Black Gold Boom" series.

Hoping The Downplay Hurts The Greed

Don Williams offers up an unexpected side effect to the oil patch slowdown: lower prices. When the boom was churning at full speed, rents were too darn high. And now? Williams still has job at transload company in Ross, North Dakota, and things aren’t so expensive. This story aired on Prairie Public and Marketplace as part of my "Black Gold Boom" series.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

'Oil To Die For'

For the third year in a row, North Dakota ranks as the most deadly place to work in America and its oilfields are nearly seven times more dangerous than elsewhere in the U.S. “Oil To Die For,” a new interactive documentary from Black Gold Boom, examines how Dustin Bergsing died of hydrocarbon poisoning at a North Dakota well site just days before his 22nd birthday. He was engaged to be married and the father of an infant. The interactive examines the circumstances surrounding Bergsing’s death, including accusations by a Marathon Oil whistleblower who says his safety warnings were ignored by company bosses. “Oil To Die For” is compatible with all devices, including Apple and Android mobile phones and tablets. Experience it now.